Choosing Kyphoplasty for Spinal Fractures

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Do you have back pain and worry it might be a spinal fracture? Many people, especially those with osteoporosis, have severe back pain caused by spine fractures. A spinal fracture can be extremely painful and may result in immobility or disfigurement. If you have osteoporosis or pain from a spinal fracture that has left you unable to perform everyday tasks, consider kyphoplasty to get you going again.

What Is Kyphoplasty?

Kyphoplasty is a minimally invasive procedure that uses a balloon to lift the vertebrae and create a cavity for bone cement to stabilize the fracture. Kyphoplasty treatment can repair spinal fractures caused by osteoporosis, cancer or benign lesions and help to reduce pain.

About Kyphoplasty Surgery

Kyphoplasty is a minimally invasive produce which can take about an hour to treat a fracture. The procedure can be done on an outpatient or an inpatient basis, depending on the needs of the patient.

The main goals of kyphoplasty for patients suffering from painful vertebral compression fractures are:

  1. To reduce or eliminate back pain
  2. To prevent further collapse of the fractures which helps avoid an increase in spinal deformity and progression of postural problems
  3. To restore normal spinal alignment to improve the patient’s posture

Is Kyphoplasty Right for You?

Make an appointment with one of IMS Pain Management’s experienced physicians to see if you are a candidate for kyphoplasty. Make sure to discuss any concerns with your doctor before the procedure. Risks of kyphoplasty may include:

  • Infection
  • Bleeding
  • Increased back pain
  • Tingling or numbness due to nerve damage

Don’t let spinal fractures keep you from the activities you enjoy! Kyphoplasty may repair your spinal fractures, allowing you to enjoy long-term improvements in mobility, restored vertebral body height and reduced back pain.

Find out about the top 5 culprits of lower back pain and discover how to find relief today.

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